Matthew J. Czarny, MD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore speaks about Aortic Stenosis Most Common In White And Hispanic Adults.Link to Article:https://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/structural-heart-disease/aortic-stenosis-most-common-white-and-hispanic-adults?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=cvb_heart_diseaseAccording to recent research published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, aortic stenosis (AS) is more common among white and Hispanic people.Researchers monitored data from a varied U.S. cohort of more than 3,000 patients between the ages of 45 and 85, led by cardiologist Matthew J. Czarny, MD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. From 2000 to 2002, patients with no history of cardiovascular illness received transthoracic echocardiography at one of six sites. Based on American Society of Echocardiography standards, a panel of two clinical cardiologists evaluated if each patient had AS.White people made up 39.8% of the participants, while Black people made up 25.1 percent, Hispanic people made up 21.7 percent, and Chinese people made up 13.4%. The median age was 73, and women made up 53% of the population.The researchers discovered that 77 individuals had symptoms of AS. There were 29 individuals with mild AS and 48 with moderate or severe AS. Aortic valve replacement was performed on a total of 22 individuals (AVR).Hispanic (3.7%) and white (3.5%) persons had the highest rates of AS. The raters were much lower among Black (1.8%) and Chinese (0.3%) individuals. There were no correlations between race/ethnicity and the severity of AS.The researchers did caution, however, that omitting individuals with a history of clinical cardiovascular illness may have influenced the findings, resulting in lower rates of AS prevalence than would otherwise be found. - Aortic Stenosis - 472_600c9efaa3c99

Matthew J. Czarny, MD @MatthewCzarnyMD @hopkinsheart @HopkinsMedicine #AroticStenosis #Cardiology #Research Aortic Stenosis Most Common In White And Hispanic Adults

Matthew J. Czarny, MD @MatthewCzarnyMD @hopkinsheart @HopkinsMedicine #AroticStenosis #Cardiology #Research Aortic Stenosis Most Common In White And Hispanic Adults

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Matthew J. Czarny, MD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore speaks about Aortic Stenosis Most Common In White And Hispanic Adults.

Link to Article:
https://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/structural-heart-disease/aortic-stenosis-most-common-white-and-hispanic-adults?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=cvb_heart_disease

According to recent research published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, aortic stenosis (AS) is more common among white and Hispanic people.

Researchers monitored data from a varied U.S. cohort of more than 3,000 patients between the ages of 45 and 85, led by cardiologist Matthew J. Czarny, MD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. From 2000 to 2002, patients with no history of cardiovascular illness received transthoracic echocardiography at one of six sites. Based on American Society of Echocardiography standards, a panel of two clinical cardiologists evaluated if each patient had AS.

White people made up 39.8% of the participants, while Black people made up 25.1 percent, Hispanic people made up 21.7 percent, and Chinese people made up 13.4%. The median age was 73, and women made up 53% of the population.

The researchers discovered that 77 individuals had symptoms of AS. There were 29 individuals with mild AS and 48 with moderate or severe AS. Aortic valve replacement was performed on a total of 22 individuals (AVR).

Hispanic (3.7%) and white (3.5%) persons had the highest rates of AS. The raters were much lower among Black (1.8%) and Chinese (0.3%) individuals. There were no correlations between race/ethnicity and the severity of AS.

The researchers did caution, however, that omitting individuals with a history of clinical cardiovascular illness may have influenced the findings, resulting in lower rates of AS prevalence than would otherwise be found.

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