Dr. Borge Gronne Nordestgaard is a clinical biochemist, genetic epidemiologist, educator, and Danish National Board of Health certified clinical biochemistry specialist. He received the Boserup Foundation's prize in 1994, the Quentin's Foundation's prize in 2001, and the Carlsen's Foundation's prize in 2005. In this video Dr. Nordestgaard speaks on how Elevated remnant cholesterol increases the risk of peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, and ischaemic stroke.Link to Abstract:https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/eurheartj/ehab705/6399975?login=trueAimsCholesterol in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, also known as residue cholesterol, is increasingly recognized for its atherogenic potential. Remaining cholesterol levels are linked to a higher risk of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. We investigated whether high residual cholesterol is linked to an increased risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD).Methods and outcomesWe looked at 106 937 people from the Copenhagen General Population Study who were recruited between 2003 and 2015. 1586 people were diagnosed with PAD, 2570 with myocardial infarction, and 2762 with ischemic stroke over the course of the study, which lasted up to 15 years. We also looked at 13 974 people who were part of the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976–78. During the study's 43-year follow-up, 1033 people were diagnosed with PAD, 2236 with MI, and 1976 with ischemic stroke. A conventional lipid profile was used to quantify residual cholesterol. The diagnoses came from national health registries in Denmark. In the Copenhagen General Population Study, people with residual cholesterol levels of 1.5 mmol/L (58 mg/dL) vs. 0.5 mmol/L (19 mg/dL) had a multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 4.8 (95 percent confidence interval 3.1–7.5) had a greater risk of PAD. Myocardial infarction had a score of 4.2 (2.9–6.1) and ischemic stroke had a score of 1.8 (1.4–2.5). In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the associated HRs for PAD, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke were 4.9 (2.9–8.5), 2.6 (1.8–3.8), and 2.1 (1.5–3.1).ConclusionIn the general population, elevated residual cholesterol is linked to a five-fold greater risk of PAD, which is higher than the risk of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. - Acute Coronary Syndromes - 560_600c9efaa3c99

Podcast- Børge Grønne Nordestgaard, MD- Elevated remnant cholesterol increases the risk of peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, and ischaemic stroke: a cohort-based study- ...

Podcast- Børge Grønne Nordestgaard, MD- Elevated remnant cholesterol increases the risk of peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, and ischaemic stroke: a cohort-based study- ...

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Dr. Borge Gronne Nordestgaard is a clinical biochemist, genetic epidemiologist, educator, and Danish National Board of Health certified clinical biochemistry specialist. He received the Boserup Foundation's prize in 1994, the Quentin's Foundation's prize in 2001, and the Carlsen's Foundation's prize in 2005. In this video Dr. Nordestgaard speaks on how Elevated remnant cholesterol increases the risk of peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, and ischaemic stroke.

Link to Abstract:
https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/eurheartj/ehab705/6399975?login=true


Aims
Cholesterol in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, also known as residue cholesterol, is increasingly recognized for its atherogenic potential. Remaining cholesterol levels are linked to a higher risk of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. We investigated whether high residual cholesterol is linked to an increased risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Methods and outcomes
We looked at 106 937 people from the Copenhagen General Population Study who were recruited between 2003 and 2015. 1586 people were diagnosed with PAD, 2570 with myocardial infarction, and 2762 with ischemic stroke over the course of the study, which lasted up to 15 years. We also looked at 13 974 people who were part of the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976–78. During the study's 43-year follow-up, 1033 people were diagnosed with PAD, 2236 with MI, and 1976 with ischemic stroke. A conventional lipid profile was used to quantify residual cholesterol. The diagnoses came from national health registries in Denmark. In the Copenhagen General Population Study, people with residual cholesterol levels of 1.5 mmol/L (58 mg/dL) vs. 0.5 mmol/L (19 mg/dL) had a multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 4.8 (95 percent confidence interval 3.1–7.5) had a greater risk of PAD. Myocardial infarction had a score of 4.2 (2.9–6.1) and ischemic stroke had a score of 1.8 (1.4–2.5). In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the associated HRs for PAD, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke were 4.9 (2.9–8.5), 2.6 (1.8–3.8), and 2.1 (1.5–3.1).

Conclusion
In the general population, elevated residual cholesterol is linked to a five-fold greater risk of PAD, which is higher than the risk of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke.

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