Heart Awareness: Men vs. Women - What's The Difference?

Men vs. Women - What’s the Difference?

 

It's possible that you feel that men and women have an equivalent amount of cardiac awareness. However, the findings of the research point to the fact that this is not the case.

 

What are the symptoms of a sudden cardiac arrest? Are they distinct from heart attacks?

 

The primary symptom of a sudden cardiac arrest is the sudden loss of consciousness with an absence of breathing or pulse. Some patients have heart attacks before or during their sudden cardiac arrest. As such, heart attacks—blocked arteries of the heart—are a common cause for sudden death. A person suffering from a heart attack can have chest pain; weakness; discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back; and shortness of breath. A heart attack can trigger an electrical malfunction that leads to cardiac arrest. Demetri Yannopoulos, MD from the University of Minnesota Medical School and M Health Fairview

 

In the United States, heart disease is the top cause of death for women of all ages, ethnicities, and sizes. However, women and men experience heart disease differently at times. Diet and exercise go a long way toward preventing heart disease and reducing its progression if the patient already has it.

 

STEP-HFpEF Phase 3 Clinical Trial

 

This study will examine how heart failure impacts the participants' daily lives. The study will also examine the weight change of the individuals from the beginning to the conclusion. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of Semaglutide (a novel medication) on heart failure symptoms and body weight between persons taking semaglutide and those taking a placebo. The participants will either get semaglutide or a placebo; their treatment will be determined by chance. Once each week, participants will need to receive an injection. A tiny needle is used to inject the study medication into a skin fold in the abdomen, thigh, or upper arm.



During the course of the study, participants will have conversations with the research team about healthy lifestyle choices, such as healthy eating and physical activity.

The duration of the trial is approximately 59 weeks. Participants will receive eleven clinic visits and one phone conversation with the doctor conducting the study. Women who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or plan to become pregnant during the study period are ineligible to participate.

 

What Is CAD And Who Is At Risk?

 

Anyone can develop CAD. It begins when fats, cholesterol, and other substances gather along the walls of your arteries. This process is called atherosclerosis. It's typically no cause for concern. However, too much buildup can lead to a blockage, obstructing blood flow. There are a number of risk factors, common red flags, that can contribute to this and ultimately lead to coronary artery disease. First, getting older can mean more damaged and narrowed arteries. Second, men are generally at a greater risk. But the risk for women increases after menopause. Existing health conditions matter, too. High blood pressure can thicken your arteries, narrowing your blood flow. High cholesterol levels can increase the rate of plaque buildup. Diabetes is also associated with higher risk, as is being overweight. Your lifestyle plays a large role as well. Physical inactivity, long periods of unrelieved stress in your life, an unhealthy diet and smoking can all increase your risk. And finally, family history. If a close relative was diagnosed at an early age with heart disease, you're at a greater risk. All these factors together can paint a picture of your risk for developing CAD. Stephen Kopecky, MD, Cardiovascular Disease, Mayo Clinic

 

Echocardiographic Assessment of Pulmonary Transit Time Following Exercise Phase 4 Clinical Trial

 

Echocardiography can be used to evaluate the quantity of fluid in a patient's circulatory system, which can affect the diagnosis and treatment of certain types of heart failure. In certain people, the amount of fluid is normal at rest but may increase during physical activity. Therefore, heart failure cannot be identified until after physical activity. 

 

Currently, fluid measurement is an invasive procedure. Without requiring an invasive procedure, we have proved that echocardiography can estimate fluid in the pulmonary circulation during rest. Now, we want to investigate if a similar assessment can be made after physical activity. In the event of success, certain kinds of heart failure may require fewer catheterizations. 

 

Echocardiography can be used to evaluate the quantity of fluid in a patient's circulatory system, which can affect the diagnosis and treatment of certain types of heart failure. In certain people, the amount of fluid is normal at rest but may increase during physical activity. Therefore, heart failure cannot be identified until after physical activity. Currently, fluid measurement is an invasive procedure. 

 

Without requiring an invasive procedure, we have proved that echocardiography can estimate fluid in the pulmonary circulation during rest. Now, we want to investigate if a similar assessment can be made after physical activity. In the event of success, certain kinds of heart failure may require fewer catheterizations.

 

GUARD-AF Phase 4 Clinical Trial

 

The purpose of this research is to determine whether or not a detection intervention for atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL) in people who are at least 70 years old and have not previously been diagnosed with either condition can reduce the person-years incidence rate of stroke in comparison to standard therapy (no AF detection intervention).

 

Screening for atrial fibrillation (AF) is desirable due to the fact that AF alone increases the risk of ischemic stroke, that this risk is usually reversible with long-term oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT), and that many patients who have AF go unreported and untreated. Atrial fibrillation (AF) screenings that have been conducted more recently have not led to a discernible increase in the number of individuals who are identified as having AF. In trials of longer-term screening, there has been an increase in the number of patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, particularly paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, as of yet, there has been no clinical research that has demonstrated that screening for atrial fibrillation reduces the risk of stroke. Screening for atrial fibrillation is encouraged to varying degrees, depending on the clinical practice standards that are being followed.

 

GUARD-AF is the largest randomized trial for AF screening that uses a patch-based continuous electrocardiographic monitor for a longer period of time. The findings will provide valuable information on the yield of patch-based AF screening, the "load" of AF detected (percent time in AF, longest episode), and physicians' OAC recommendations in relation to AF burden. The stroke and bleed results from GUARD-AF will be included in pooled trial analyses of AF screening, informing future research and guidelines.

 

Women Found To Be At Higher Risk For Heart Failure And Heart Attack Death Than Men

 

Identifying when and how women may be at higher risk for heart failure after a heart attack can help providers develop more effective approaches for prevention." “Better adherence to reducing cholesterol, controlling high blood pressure, getting more exercise, eating a healthy diet and stopping smoking, combined with recognition of these problems earlier in life would save thousands of lives of women — and men.” Justin A. Ezekowitz, M.B.B.Ch., M.Sc., is a cardiologist and co-director of the Canadian VIGOUR Centre at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

 

In conclusion, the research suggests that women are more susceptible to heart failure and heart attack than men. However, regardless of the gender of their patients, doctors should have conversations with them to ensure that their patients are aware of the risks and the factors that can cause this. As time goes on and these studies continue, we will have access to more facts, allowing us to make more informed decisions.

 

References

 

  1. ClinicalTrials.gov - Phase 3 - Research Study to Investigate How Well Semaglutide Works in People Living With Heart Failure and Obesity (STEP-HFpEF). ClinicalTrials.gov, September 22, 2022

  2. ClinicalTrials.gov - Exercise Pulmonary Transit Time. ClinicalTrials.gov,  July 12, 2022

  3. ClinicalTrials.gov - Abbreviate or FAST Breast MRI for Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening for Black Women at Average Risk and Dense Breasts. ClinicalTrials.gov, July 13, 2022

  4. University of Minnesota - Talking cardiac awareness with U of M. University of Minnesota News

  5. Mayo Clinic - Heart disease. MayoClinic, no date of publication

  6. American Heart Association - Women found to be at higher risk for heart failure and heart attack death than men. American Heart Association, November 30, 2020

 

Heart Awareness: Men vs. Women - What's The Difference?

Heart Awareness: Men vs. Women - What's The Difference?
1 month 13 Views
Category: