Carol Chiung-Hui Peng, MD and Kashif Munir, MD, Medical Director Of The University Of Maryland Center For Diabetes And Endrocrinology, University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus, University of Maryland School of Medicine speaks about Fracture Risks in Patients Treated With Different Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis.Link To Abstract:https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.120.019618Summary -Background: To evaluate the fracture risk associated with NOACs and warfarin, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis.Methods and Results: From inception to May 19, 2020, we searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included studies that recorded measurements for any fracture in NOAC and warfarin users (regardless of major, secondary, tertiary, or safety outcomes). Two or more reviewers worked together to screen relevant papers, extract data, and evaluate accuracy. To synthesize the pooled relative risk (RR) of fractures associated with NOACs versus warfarin, data were retrieved. For data synthesis, random-effects models were used. There were 388 209 patients in 29 studies (5 cohort studies and 24 randomized controlled trials). Patients taking NOACs had a lower risk of fracture than those taking warfarin (pooled RR, 0.84; 95 percent CI, 0.77–0.91; P0.001), and there was little variability (I2=38.9%). NOACs were also linked to a lower risk of hip fracture than warfarin (pooled risk ratio, 0.89; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.81–0.98; P=0.023). There was also a nonsignificant trend of NOAC users having a lower risk of vertebral fracture (pooled RR, 0.74; 95 percent CI, 0.54–1.01; P=0.061). Specific NOACs dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban were found to be significantly associated with lower fracture risks in subgroup analyses. Furthermore, the data synthesis results from randomized controlled trials and real-world cohort studies were remarkably consistent, suggesting the validity of our findings.Conclusions:NOACs are associated with a lower risk of bone fracture as compared to warfarin. - Anticoagulation Management - 365_600c9efaa3c99

Carol Peng, MD Kashif Munir, MD @CCPeng98 @ummidtownim #HualienTzuChiHospital #Anticoagulants #Cardiology #Research Fracture Risks in Patients Treated With Different Oral Anticoagulants

Carol Peng, MD Kashif Munir, MD @CCPeng98 @ummidtownim #HualienTzuChiHospital #Anticoagulants #Cardiology #Research Fracture Risks in Patients Treated With Different Oral Anticoagulants

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Carol Chiung-Hui Peng, MD and Kashif Munir, MD, Medical Director Of The University Of Maryland Center For Diabetes And Endrocrinology, University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus, University of Maryland School of Medicine speaks about Fracture Risks in Patients Treated With Different Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis.

Link To Abstract:
https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.120.019618

Summary -

Background: 
To evaluate the fracture risk associated with NOACs and warfarin, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods and Results: 
From inception to May 19, 2020, we searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included studies that recorded measurements for any fracture in NOAC and warfarin users (regardless of major, secondary, tertiary, or safety outcomes). Two or more reviewers worked together to screen relevant papers, extract data, and evaluate accuracy. To synthesize the pooled relative risk (RR) of fractures associated with NOACs versus warfarin, data were retrieved. For data synthesis, random-effects models were used. There were 388 209 patients in 29 studies (5 cohort studies and 24 randomized controlled trials). Patients taking NOACs had a lower risk of fracture than those taking warfarin (pooled RR, 0.84; 95 percent CI, 0.77–0.91; P0.001), and there was little variability (I2=38.9%). NOACs were also linked to a lower risk of hip fracture than warfarin (pooled risk ratio, 0.89; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.81–0.98; P=0.023). There was also a nonsignificant trend of NOAC users having a lower risk of vertebral fracture (pooled RR, 0.74; 95 percent CI, 0.54–1.01; P=0.061). Specific NOACs dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban were found to be significantly associated with lower fracture risks in subgroup analyses. Furthermore, the data synthesis results from randomized controlled trials and real-world cohort studies were remarkably consistent, suggesting the validity of our findings.

Conclusions:
NOACs are associated with a lower risk of bone fracture as compared to warfarin.